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Dr. Beth Burnside Investigating Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

The University of Wisconsin, in a partnership with the Morgridge Institute for Research and the Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to establish the Center for Predictive Computational Phenotyping (CPCP), as one of NIH's new Centers of Excellence for Big Data Computing in the Biomedical Sciences. The grant will provide nearly $11 million over a four-year period. While there are many projects underway at the CPCP, including studies on heart attacks and blood clots, UW Radiology is chiefly involved with investigating breast cancer. Representing UW Radiology is Dr. Beth Burnside, the only clinician acting as a primary investigator on the project. Her team, led by Yirong Wu, Ph.D., will use computational modeling to predict the likely phenotype of future breast cancer based on known and newly discovered demographic, genetic, and imaging risk factors. This predictive phenotyping is designed to inform the optimal use of breast cancer screening modalities such as digital mammography and ultrasound in a personalized manner. Tailoring the imaging method to the individual patient can allow clinicians to proactively detect and diagnose meaningful cancers (those that cause morbidity and mortality), while limiting testing that is unnecessary or will increase false positives and overdiagnosis. The Center for Predictive Computational Phenotyping (CPCP) is one of 11 NIH Centers of Excellence intended to accelerate the impact of predictive modeling on clinical practice. The CPCP will focus on issues related to computational phenotyping and produce disease prediction models from machine learning and statistical methods. These models will integrate data from electronic health records, images, molecular profiles and other datasets to predict patient risks for breast cancer, heart attacks and severe blood clots. Project PIs come from a wide array of disciplines including engineering, bioinformatics, statistics, computer science, and radiology. Learn more about the Centers of Excellence for Big Data Computing  

Dr. Salkowski to Chair RSNA Education Study Section

Professor Lonie Salkowski, M.D., has been appointed Vice-Chair for the RSNA Education Study Section from December 2014 to December 2015, to be followed by a three year term as Chair of the RSNA Education Study Section through December 2018. Dr. Salkowski brings a wealth of educational experience to the table, including a master's degree in Education Leadership and Policy Analysis and co-authorship of an anatomical imaging textbook, "Imaging Atlas of Human Anatomy," now in its fourth edition. The RSNA Education Study Section plays an extremely important role in the Research & Education (R&E) Foundation's efforts and is critical to its success. Through funding grants and awards to individuals and institutions, the R&E Foundation advances radiologic research, education, practice, and ultimately patient care. In its 30-year history, the foundation has awarded $44 million in support of more than 1,100 grant projects. According to RSNA.org, surveys of grant recipients reveal that for every dollar granted, foundation grant recipients receive more than $40 in subsequent funding as principal or co-investigator from sources such as the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, and National Cancer Institute.  

Resident Dustin Pooler Awarded RSNA Trainee Research Prize

Second-year resident Dustin Pooler, M.D. collected an RSNA Trainee Research Prize for a project exploring missed colorectal polyps during optical colonoscopy examinations. Professor Perry Pickhardt, M.D., and Professor David H. Kim, M.D. served as co-authors and mentors on the paper. The purpose of the study was to determine why about 10% of polpys detected during CT colonography (CTC) are "lost" during the follow-up procedure using conventional optical colonoscopy (OC), referred to as an OC false negative. Pooler discovered that lost polyps were more likely to be in the right colon, and of the 26 polyps missed in OC, six turned out to be advanced lesions. These OC false negatives are more likely to be larger in size, non-flat, and called with high diagnostic confidence compared to CTC false positives. Pooler will jointly present the research with Pickhardt at RSNA 2014 as part of a session focusing on gastrointestinal imaging. During the same session, Pickhardt is also presenting a lecture on CT colonography screening. We congratulate Pooler, Pickhardt, and Kim on their achievements, and look forward to their presentations this fall.  

Preview: UW at RSNA 2014

The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA®) is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists and other medical professionals with more than 54,000 members from 136 countries across the globe. RSNA hosts the world's premier radiology forum, drawing approximately 55,000 attendees annually to McCormick Place in Chicago, and publishes two top peer-reviewed journals: Radiology, the highest-impact scientific journal in the field, and RadioGraphics, the only journal dedicated to continuing education in radiology. Here's a preview of UW Radiology's presence at RSNA 2014: Hailey Allen, M.D.
  • MRI and PET/CT Correlation in the Imaging Assessment of Cervical and Endometrial Cancer
Peter Bannas, M.D., Bracco Fellowship
  • Intra-individual Comparison of Magnesium Citrate and Sodium Phosphate for Bowel Preparation at CT Colonography: Automated Volumetric Analysis of Residual Fluid for Quality Assessment
Donna G. Blankenbaker, M.D.
  • Refresher Course: Imaging and Treatment of the Snapping Hip
Elizabeth S. Burnside, M.D., M.Ph.
  • Refresher Course: Advances in Radiology Decision Support
  • Refresher Course: Tapping into Big Data in Images: Annotation and Image Markup, Tools, and Applications
  • The Predictive Value of BI-RADS Descriptors and Genetic Variants in Women Undergoing Breast Biopsy
  • Using Computer-extracted Features from Tumors on Breast MRI to Predict Stage
Michael Cathey, M.D
  • Seeing is Believing: Laryngeal Carcinoma Imaging and Laryngoscopy Correlation
  • Getting an Ear Full: Imaging Features of Tympanosclerosis
Steve Cho, M.D
  • Refresher Course: New Paradigms for the Treatment of Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas: The Crucial Role of Imaging
  • Comparison of PET/CT to Conventional Imaging Modalities in the Detection of Metastatic Prostate Cancer
  • PET-based Parameters for Total Tumor Burden at Diagnosis are Highly Predictive for Outcome in Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL): A Retrospective Study
Wendy DeMartini, M.D.
  • MR Imaging-guided Breast Biopsy (Hands-on Workshop)
  • Percutaneous Breast Biopsies
Aaron S. Field, M.D., Ph.D.
  • Refresher Course: Multiple Sclerosis
  • Refresher Course: Advanced Imaging in MS
  • A Degradation of Diagnostic Image Quality in Musculoskeletal CT Imaging
Christopher François, M.D.
  • Refresher Course: 4D MRI Flow Quantification
  • Precision of CTA-based Aortic Annulus Area Measurements for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)
Lance T. Hall, M.D.
  • New PET CNS Oncology Approaches
  • Prospective Evaluation of 124I-CLR1404 PET/CT in Glioma
  • Half Dose Myocardial Perfusion SPECT
Eric Hartman, M.D.
  • Diagnosing Shoulder Arthritis: Beyond DJD and HADD
J. Louis Hinshaw, M.D.
  • Does an Intra-parenchymal Blood Patch Decrease the Rate of Pneumothorax-related Complications in Patients Undergoing Image-guided Lung Biopsy?
  • Patients with Emphysema: What is the Actual Risk of Pneumothorax-related Complications for these Patients during Percutaneous Lung Biopsies?
  • Surveillance Imaging Following Focal Ablative Therapies (Microwave, Radio-frequency Ablation, Cryoablation)
  • Evaluation of an Experimental Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection during Percutaneous Microwave Ablation
  • Microwave versus Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of HCC: A Comparison of Efficacy and Safety at a Single Center
Jeffrey P. Kanne, M.D.
  • Chest Keynote Speaker: Picture Perfect-Where the HRCT Diagnosis Is Virtually Certain
  • Smoking Related Lung Disease
  • Waiting to Exhale: What's the Latest with Inhalation Lung Diseases? (An Interactive Session)
  • Evil Humors: Thoracic Manifestations of Immunoglobulin Related Disease in Adults
  • Post-processing of 3rd and 4th Generation Bronchial Luminal Cross-sectional Area at End-expiration Significantly Differs in Asthmatics
Frederick Kelcz, M.D., Ph.D.
  • Initial Testing of an In-bore MRI-guided Real-time Breast Biopsy System
Tabby Kennedy, M.D.
  • Stroke Code CT Communication Compliance: Practice Quality Improvement
  • Temporal Bone Imaging: Anatomy
  • Comparative Cadaver Study of MDCT and C-Arm CT Imaging of the Temporal Bone before and after Cochlear Electrode Implantation: Image Quality and Dose Distribution
  • Getting an Ear Full: Imaging Features of Tympanosclerosis
  • Seeing is Believing: Laryngeal Carcinoma Imaging and Laryngoscopy Correlation
  • Understanding the Differences in Radiation Dose Distribution between Multi Detector CT and C-arm CT for High Contrast Imaging
David Kim, M.D.
  • Refresher Course: Interpretation Principles and the Difficult Lesion
  • Hot Topic Session: Imaging of Oncologic Surveillance in the Era of Local Targeted Therapies
  • Does an Intra-parenchymal Blood Patch Decrease the Rate of Pneumothorax-related Complications in Patients Undergoing Image-guided Lung Biopsy?
  • Patients with Emphysema: What is the Actual Risk of Pneumothorax-related Complications for these Patients during Percutaneous Lung Biopsies?
  • Missed Colorectal Polyps at Optical Colonoscopy Despite Prospectively Known Positive CT Colonography Findings
Fred T. Lee Jr, M.D.
  • Ablation of Liver Lesions
  • Does an Intra-parenchymal Blood Patch Decrease the Rate of Pneumothorax-related Complications in Patients Undergoing Image-guided Lung Biopsy?
  • Patients with Emphysema: What is the Actual Risk of Pneumothorax-related Complications for these Patients during Percutaneous Lung Biopsies?
  • Evaluation of an Experimental Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection during Percutaneous Microwave Ablation: In Vivo Results
  • Microwave versus Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of HCC: A Comparison of Efficacy and Safety at a Single Center
  • Small Renal Mass (T1a): The Case for Microwave
Kenneth S. Lee, M.D.
  • Techniques for Interventional Sonography and Thermal Ablation (Hands-on Workshop)
  • Master Class in Musculoskeletal Ultrasound (How-to Workshop)
  • Nerve Ultrasound Based on a Regional Approach: Shoulder and Neck (Hands-on Workshop)
  • Dynamic Musculoskeletal US: Clicks and Clunks of the Upper Extremity (Hands-on Workshop)
  • Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy of the Tendon
Matthew Lee, M.D.
  • Evil Humors: Thoracic Manifestations of Immunoglobulin Related Disease in Adults
  • Take Me to Your Leader: What to Know About Adult Intussusception
  • Gastrointestinal Case of the Day
Meghan Lubner, M.D.
  • Volumetric Assessment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Reproducibility by Reader, Site, and Time Point
  • Does an Intra-parenchymal Blood Patch Decrease the Rate of Pneumothorax-related Complications in Patients Undergoing Image-guided Lung Biopsy?
  • Patients with Emphysema: What is the Actual Risk of Pneumothorax-related Complications for these Patients during Percutaneous Lung Biopsies?
  • Determining the Need for Surgical Intervention for Small Bowel Obstruction Based on MDCT Findings: Multi-reader Study Comparing Experienced Radiologists with Newly Board-certified Radiologists
  • Gastrointestinal Case of the Day
  • Evaluation of an Experimental Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection during Percutaneous Microwave Ablation: In Vivo Results
  • Compressed Sensing Based Metal Artifact Reduction (CS-MAR) Algorithm
  • Take Me to Your Leader: What to Know About Adult Intussusception
  • Microwave versus Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of HCC: A Comparison of Efficacy and Safety at a Single Center
Brittany Mei Young
  • Characterizing Relationships of DTI, fMRI, and Motor Recovery in Stroke Rehabilitation Using Brain-Computer Interface Technology
  • Changes in Functional Connectivity Correlate with Behavioral Gains in Stroke Patients after Therapy Using a Brain-Computer Interface Device
Scott Nagle, M.D., Ph.D.
  • MR: Practical Proton and Perfusion Imaging
  • Precision of CTA-based Aortic Annulus Area Measurements for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR): Effects of Reader Experience and Implications for Appropriate Device Sizing
  • Pediatrics Keynote Speaker: Imaging of Cystic Fibrosis-State of the Art
James Patrick, M.D., Ph.D.
  • Determining the Need for Surgical Intervention for Small Bowel Obstruction Based on MDCT Findings: Multi-reader Study Comparing Experienced Radiologists with Newly Board-certified Radiologists
Perry J. Pickhardt, M.D.
  • CT Colonography and Colorectal Cancer Screening
  • Artistic Expression for Diagnostic Imaging: Thinking Outside of the Light Box
  • Does an Intra-parenchymal Blood Patch Decrease the Rate of Pneumothorax-related Complications in Patients Undergoing Image-guided Lung Biopsy?
  • Patients with Emphysema: What is the Actual Risk of Pneumothorax-related Complications for these Patients during Percutaneous Lung Biopsies?
  • Direct Comparison of Contrast-Enhanced MRI with Contrast-Enhanced CT to Diagnose Appendicitis
  • Temporal Variations in Presentation for MDCT for Suspected Acute Appendicitis in Adults
  • Accuracy of Liver Fat Quantification by CT, MRI and US: A Prospective Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS)
  • Volumetric Assessment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Reproducibility by Reader, Site, and Time Point
  • Determining the Need for Surgical Intervention for Small Bowel Obstruction Based on MDCT Findings: Multi-reader Study Comparing Experienced Radiologists with Newly Board-certified Radiologists
  • Missed Colorectal Polyps at Optical Colonoscopy Despite Prospectively Known Positive CT Colonography Findings
  • Going Down the Wrong Pathology
  • Intra-individual Comparison of Magnesium Citrate and Sodium Phosphate for Bowel Preparation at CT Colonography: Automated Volumetric Analysis of Residual Fluid for Quality Assessment
  • Opportunistic Osteoporosis Screening: Addition of QCT BMD Measurement to CT Colonography Fits a Clinical Need
  • Prospective Evaluation of 124I-CLR1404 PET/CT in Glioma
  • Compressed Sensing Based Metal Artifact Reduction (CS-MAR) Algorithm
  • Take Me to Your Leader: What to Know About Adult Intussusception
  • Thinking Outside the Bone: A Pictorial Review of Extramedullary Hematopoiesis
B. Dustin Pooler, M.D.
  • Temporal Variations in Presentation for MDCT for Suspected Acute Appendicitis in Adults
  • Missed Colorectal Polyps at Optical Colonoscopy Despite Prospectively Known Positive CT Colonography Findings
Ryan Raut, (Undergraduate Researcher, Dr. Prabhakaran's Neuroimaging Lab)
  • Altered Functional Activation Maps in Healthy Aging and Stroke due to Neurovascular Uncoupling
Scott B. Reeder, M.D., Ph.D.
  • Non-contrast MRA of the Abdomen
  • Non-contrast MRA: Phase-contrast MRA
  • Direct Comparison of Contrast-Enhanced MRI with Contrast-Enhanced CT to Diagnose Appendicitis
  • Accuracy of Liver Fat Quantification by CT, MRI and US: A Prospective Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS)
Humberto Rosas, M.D.
  • Performing Lumbar Sympathetic Blocks: A New Technique
  • Techniques for Interventional Sonography and Thermal Ablation (Hands-on Workshop)
  • Nerve Ultrasound Based on a Regional Approach: Shoulder and Neck (Hands-on Workshop)
  • Diagnosing Shoulder Arthritis: Beyond DJD and HADD
  • Dynamic Musculoskeletal US: Clicks and Clunks of the Upper Extremity (Hands-on Workshop)
Elizabeth Sadowski, M.D.
  • Genitourinary Keynote Speaker: The Utility of 3D-MRI and MR-HSG in the Work Up of Infertility
  • Acute Pelvic Pain in Women of Reproductive Age: Imaging Review of Gynecological Causes
  • MRI and PET/CT Correlation in the Imaging Assessment of Cervical and Endometrial Cancer
Mark L. Schiebler, M.D.
  • Refresher Course: Optimizing Pulmonary MRA
  • Post-processing of 3rd and 4th Generation Bronchial Luminal Cross-sectional Area at End-expiration Significantly Differs in Asthmatics: A Newly Discovered Biomechanical Difference Found in Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) Subjects
  • Chest (Lung Cancer Screening)
  • Female Asthmatics Show a BMI Dependent Change in their Deltalumen: SARP Cohort Data Shows that Females are More at Risk than Males for Bronchial Collapse with an Increase in Weight
  • Pulmonary Thromboembolism: Concepts and Controversies 2014
Ken L. Schreibman, M.D., Ph.D.
  • ASRT@RSNA 2014: Shoulder Imaging
  • A Degradation of Diagnostic Image Quality in Musculoskeletal CT Imaging: Loss of Image Sharpness in CT Bone Imaging due to Positioning within the Scan Field of View - Causes and Several Possible Solutions
Tim Szczykutowicz, Ph.D.
  • Understanding the Differences in Radiation Dose Distribution between Multi Detector CT and C-arm CT for High Contrast Imaging
  • Comparative Cadaver Study of MDCT and C-Arm CT Imaging of the Temporal Bone before and after Cochlear Electrode Implantation: Image Quality and Dose Distribution
  • The Feasibility of 2D Fluence Field Modulated CT Using Attenuating Filters
  • The Correct Selection of Pitch and Rotation Time for Optimal CT Scanning - "The Big Misconception"; The Effects of Pitch on Image Quality and Patient Dose in Both Manual mA and AEC - mA Modulation Scanning Modes
  • A Degradation of Diagnostic Image Quality in Musculoskeletal CT Imaging: Loss of Image Sharpness in CT Bone Imaging due to Positioning within the Scan Field of View - Causes and Several Possible Solutions
  • The Master CT Protocol Concept in Practice: How a Small Set of Optimized Protocols Can Be Used to Create Acquisition Parameters for a Wide Range of Clinical Indications
  • A Metric for Measuring Noise Non-uniformity in Clinical CT Images
  • A Comparison of Three Methods for Measuring Patient Positioning from Localizer Imaging in CT: Which Correlates Best with Optimal Image Quality?
Patrick Turski, M.D., FACR
  • Refresher Course: Non-traumatic CNS Hemorrhage
  • Refresher Course: Non-Traumatic Neuro Emergencies
  • To Bleed or Not to Bleed: An Updated Review of the Causes and MR Appearance of Cerebral Microhemorrhages
Gary Wendt, M.D., MBA
  • PACS and Radiologist Workflow in a Multi-Enterprise Environment
  • Informatics (Image Sharing)
Timothy Ziemlewicz, M.D.
  • Opportunistic Osteoporosis Screening: Addition of QCT BMD Measurement to CT Colonography Fits a Clinical Need
  • Acute Pelvic Pain in Women of Reproductive Age: Imaging Review of Gynecological Causes
  • Does an Intra-parenchymal Blood Patch Decrease the Rate of Pneumothorax-related Complications in Patients Undergoing Image-guided Lung Biopsy?
  • Patients with Emphysema: What is the Actual Risk of Pneumothorax-related Complications for these Patients during Percutaneous Lung Biopsies?
  • Direct Comparison of Contrast-Enhanced MRI with Contrast-Enhanced CT to Diagnose Appendicitis
  • Gastrointestinal (Large Bowel and Appendiceal Imaging)
  • Evaluation of an Experimental Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection during Percutaneous Microwave Ablation: In Vivo Results
  • Microwave versus Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of HCC: A Comparison of Efficacy and Safety at a Single Center
 

Birrenkott Garners AAARAD Lifetime Achievement Award

After nearly two decades of service, Margaret Birrenkott, MBA, Department of Radiology Administrator and Director of Business Services, was honored with the 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of Administrators in Academic Radiology (AAARAD). Joining the association in 1996, Birrenkott's contributions are too numerous to count, and include formal lectures, presentations, and leadership at AAARAD, as well as informal guidance and mentorship of new Radiology administrators. In this regard the award appropriately recognizes Margaret's broad impact throughout academic radiology. Following two years on the Board of Directors, she assumed the role of President from 2005 to 2006. As president, she presided over three national conferences, conducted monthly board meetings, and created a strategic plan for the future of the association. In addition, Birrenkott created content for "Business of Radiology" presentations directed at radiology residents, to help them better understand the business aspects of academic radiology. Content covered in these lectures included strategic financial topics as well as tactics to align Departmental culture and values. AAARAD was established in 2004 after a split from the predecessor organization of Association of Administrators in Academic Radiology and Radiation Oncology (AAARRO). AAARAD's goals are to encourage member-to-member networking, foster greater professional collaboration with departmental chairs, and create education opportunities for administrators and business professionals working in academic radiology. We at UW Radiology congratulate Ms. Birrenkott on her success.  

Drs. Pickhardt, Lubner, Sheehan Recognized by RSNA

(L-R): Dr. Lubner, Dr. Sheehan, and Dr. Pickhardt
Chief of Gastrointestinal Imaging Professor Perry Pickhardt, M.D., Assistant Professor Meghan Lubner, M.D., and Musculoskeletal Imaging Fellow Scott Sheehan, M.D. were all selected for the 2014 RSNA Honored Educator Award. With just 42 awardees selected from 53,000 members worldwide, Drs. Pickhardt, Lubner, and Sheehan represent UW Radiology's commitment to education on a global scale. Established in 2011, the Honored Educator Award is designed to recognize RSNA members who have furthered the societies' educational mission in the past calendar year. Qualifying educational activities include authoring an educational exhibit or article, donating a refresher course, or serving as faculty at an educational meeting. Dr. Lubner has served on the Education Exhibit Awards Committee for three years, and she coordinated the reviews of over 300 gastrointestinal exhibits as GI Team Captain this past fall. Dr. Pickhardt collaborated on nearly 20 posters and papers accepted to the upcoming 2014 meeting. Dr. Sheehan has produced a number of publications for the journal Radiographics, and has had successful education exhibits in recent years at the RSNA annual meeting, earning certificates of merit and a magna cum laude recognition. Drs. Pickhardt, Lubner, and Sheehan are following in the footsteps of two-time winner Dr. Jeffrey Kanne, who garnered selections in 2012 and 2013.

Professor Schiebler Honored by UW Department of Medicine

Associate Professor Mark Schiebler, M.D., received the 2014 Extra Mile Award from the UW Department of Medicine (DOM), the only UW faculty member from outside of the DOM to receive an award at their 2014 faculty dinner and awards ceremony. The Extra Mile Award is given on an irregular basis, and the last UW Radiology member to earn the Extra Mile Award was Emeritus Professor Donald R. Yandow , M.D., placing Dr. Schiebler in esteemed company. Dr. Schiebler pointed to his didactic course on pulmonary medicine as a strong reason for winning the award, as well as his contributions to DOM colleagues in the reading room.    

Best Radiology Image Award for Hall Group in the Minnies

The Minnies Best Radiology Image Winner: PET of patient with grade III glioma using iodine-124 (I-124) CLR1404 radiopharmaceutical This year's Best Radiology Image award went to researchers from the University of Wisconsin for their image series demonstrating a new PET radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging. They believe the agent could more effective than nuclear medicine's workhorse tracer, FDG. The team led by Dr. Lance Hall, an assistant professor of radiology at the university's UW Health system, has been investigating iodine-124 (I-124) CLR1404, which is being developed for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A patient with a grade III glioma was scanned using an iodine-124 (I-124) CLR1404 radiopharmaceutical. PET with CLR1404 detected the cancer, and fused PET/MRI delineated the tumor. Images courtesy of Dr. Lance Hall and the University of Wisconsin's UW Health. CLR1404 is designed to enter cells through membrane lipid rafts, which are overexpressed in cancer cells and serve as a platform for cell proliferation. The agent is taken up by cancer stem cells, which are difficult to eradicate and can lead to disease recurrence and progression if they are not eliminated. Studies in preclinical models have demonstrated that CLR1404 is more cancer-specific and targets cancers rather than inflammation or false positives that might be found on FDG-PET scans. In the study that resulted in the award-winning images, 16 patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors were injected with the radiopharmaceutical. CLR1404 successfully imaged tumors with high tumor-to-background uptake and uncovered larger tumor volumes than contrast-enhanced MRI, the researchers found. There was no significant uptake of CLR1404 in normal areas of the brain and no uptake in regions that were treated for cancer and were presumably tumor-free. The Minnies are AuntMinnie.com's annual event recognizing excellence in radiology. First launched in 2000, the Minnies gives radiology professionals the opportunity to highlight the contributions of their peers to the advancement of medical imaging. In the 2014 edition of the Minnies, over 200 candidates faced off in 15 categories, ranging from Most Influential Radiology Researcher to Best Radiology Image. The full list of Minnies winners can be viewed at minnies.auntminnie.com.    

Best Radiology Image Award for Hall Group in the Minnies

The Minnies
Best Radiology Image

Winner: PET of patient with grade III glioma using iodine-124 (I-124) CLR1404 radiopharmaceutical

This year's Best Radiology Image award went to researchers from the University of Wisconsin for their image series demonstrating a new PET radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging. They believe the agent could be more effective than nuclear medicine's workhorse tracer, FDG.

The team led by Dr. Lance Hall, an assistant professor of radiology at the university's UW Health system, has been investigating iodine-124 (I-124) CLR1404, which is being developed for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

A patient with a grade III glioma was scanned using an iodine-124 (I-124) CLR1404 radiopharmaceutical. PET with CLR1404 detected the cancer, and fused PET/MRI delineated the tumor. Images courtesy of Dr. Lance Hall and the University of Wisconsin's UW Health. CLR1404 is designed to enter cells through membrane lipid rafts, which are overexpressed in cancer cells and serve as a platform for cell proliferation. The agent is taken up by cancer stem cells, which are difficult to eradicate and can lead to disease recurrence and progression if they are not eliminated.

Studies in preclinical models have demonstrated that CLR1404 is more cancer-specific and targets cancers rather than inflammation or false positives that might be found on FDG-PET scans. In the study that resulted in the award-winning images, 16 patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors were injected with the radiopharmaceutical.

CLR1404 successfully imaged tumors with high tumor-to-background uptake and uncovered larger tumor volumes than contrast-enhanced MRI, the researchers found. There was no significant uptake of CLR1404 in normal areas of the brain and no uptake in regions that were treated for cancer and were presumably tumor-free.

The Minnies are AuntMinnie.com's annual event recognizing excellence in radiology. First launched in 2000, the Minnies gives radiology professionals the opportunity to highlight the contributions of their peers to the advancement of medical imaging. In the 2014 edition of the Minnies, over 200 candidates faced off in 15 categories, ranging from Most Influential Radiology Researcher to Best Radiology Image. The full list of Minnies winners can be viewed at minnies.auntminnie.com.

Brucker Earns ASNR Presentation Award

Neuroradiology Fellow Justin Brucker, M.D., received a pleasant surprise this fall when he earned the Outstanding Presentation Award from the American Society of Neuroradiology (ASNR). Awarded in the category of Functional Neuroradiology, the topic of the presentation was the use of quantitative MR in reversible feline demyelination. Neurons are normally protected by a sheath of myelin, an insulating material comprised of lipids and proteins. However, diseases such as multiple sclerosis or Subacute Combined Degeneration (the human analogue of the feline disease investigated in the study) can cause the myelin to degenerate, resulting in symptoms ranging from fatigue and clumsiness to hearing and speech problems. "The award and the attention are both unexpected and flattering," said Brucker. While Brucker was the sole presenter of the study at the 2014 ASNR Annual Meeting, he co-authored the paper with Professor Aaron Field, M.D., Ph.D., and Professor Ian Duncan, DVMS, Ph.D. The purpose of the study was to investigate various quantitative MR parameters during sequential stages of central nervous system (CNS) demyelination and remyelination in felines. A portion of the subjects were placed on a diet of irradiated food to induce global CNS demyelination, and quantitative MR imaging was obtained at several different stages of the disease. The study concluded that the diseased group showed decreased magnetic transfer ratio and saturation value, quantitative measurements which indicate myelin degradation. Those values subsequently rebounded during the recovery phase of the disease, correlating with the healthy outcomes of the subjects. In addition, recovery patterns of some subjects suggest that vitamin B12 supplementation may independently promote remyelineation. The award is presented by the ASNR on behalf of the American Society for Functional Neuroradiology (ASFNR), and will be announced during the Awards Session at ASNR's 53rd Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois April 25-30, 2015.